60+ Animals That Start With N – Listed By Name, Images & Fun Facts.

Get ready for a fantastic journey as we dive into the world of animals that start with N! We’ll encounter over 60 incredible creatures, from the nimble Numbat to the majestic Narwhal.

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Join us in discovering fascinating facts, quirky behaviors, and the wonder that each of these animals adds to the incredible diversity of our natural world.

Animals That Start With N

  1. Numbat
  2. Nudibranch
  3. Nalolo
  4. Nase
  5. Neddicky
  6. Nalolo
  7. Neddicky
  8. Needlefish
  9. Nematode
  10. Nene (Hawaiian Goose)
  11. Newfoundland Dog
  12. Newfypoo (Newfoundland Poodle Mix)
  13. Newt
  14. Nicator
  15. Nicator
  16. Nicobar pigeon
  17. Noodlefish (Oodlefish)
  18. Norfolk Terrier
  19. North American Black Bear
  20. Nubian Goat
  21. Nalolo
  22. Neddicky
  23. Needlefish
  24. Nematode
  25. Nene (Hawaiian Goose)
  26. Newfoundland Dog
  27. Newfypoo (Newfoundland Poodle Mix)
  28. Newt
  29. Nicator
  30. Nicobar pigeon
  31. Noodlefish (Oodlefish)
  32. Norfolk Terrier
  33. North American Black Bear
  34. Nubian Goat
  35. Nalolo
  36. Neddicky
  37. Needlefish
  38. Nematode
  39. Nene (Hawaiian Goose)
  40. Newfoundland Dog
  41. Nutria
  42. Neddicky
  43. Nalolo
  44. Nase
  45. Nicator
  46. Nudibranch
  47. Noodlefish (Oodlefish)
  48. Nematode
  49. Newt
  50. Nalolo
  51. Neddicky
  52. Noodlefish (Oodlefish)
  53. Nicator
  54. Nicobar pigeon
  55. Nalolo
  56. Neddicky
  57. Noodlefish (Oodlefish)
  58. Nicator
  59. Nicobar pigeon
  60. Nubian Goat
  61. Neddicky
  62. Noodlefish (Oodlefish)
  63. Nicator
  64. Nicobar pigeon
  65. Nubian Goat
  66. Nuthatch
  67. Nalolo
  68. Neddicky

Naegleria

Naegleria-Image
Scientific NameNaegleria fowleri
Special HabitAmoeba, parasitic in warm water
Place of OriginWorldwide, in warm freshwater
SizeMicroscopic, amoeboid
Commonly Found InWarm freshwater environments
LifespanAmoeboid, variable depending on conditions
DietParasitic, feeds on bacteria and other microbes
ReproductionBinary fission, a form of asexual reproduction
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Naegleria fowleri can cause a rare but often fatal brain infection called amoebic meningoencephalitis.

Naked Mole Rat

Naked-Mole-Rat-Image
Scientific NameHeterocephalus glaber
Special HabitEusocial, lives in underground colonies
Place of OriginEast Africa, in arid regions
SizeSmall, around 3-4 inches in length
Commonly Found InUnderground burrows and tunnels
LifespanUp to 32 years in captivity, shorter in the wild
DietHerbivorous, mainly eats tubers and roots
ReproductionEusocial, one dominant female produces offspring
Conservation StatusLeast Concern

Naked mole rats are resistant to cancer, and they don’t feel pain caused by certain irritants.

Narwhal

Narwhal-Image
Scientific NameMonodon monoceros
Special HabitToothed whale with a long spiral tusk
Place of OriginArctic waters, near the ice edge
SizeMedium, males up to 16 feet in length
Commonly Found InArctic seas, including Canada, Greenland, and Russia
LifespanAround 50-60 years
DietCarnivorous, feeds on fish and squid
ReproductionGive birth to a single calf every 3 years
Conservation StatusNear Threatened

The narwhal’s tusk is actually an elongated tooth that can grow up to 10 feet in length.

Natterjack

Natterjack-Image
Scientific NameEpidalea calamita
Special HabitNocturnal toad, known for its loud mating calls
Place of OriginEurope and parts of Asia
SizeSmall to medium, around 2-3 inches in length
Commonly Found InCoastal areas, sand dunes, and heathlands
LifespanUp to 10 years in the wild
DietInsectivorous, feeds on various invertebrates
ReproductionLay strings of eggs in shallow water
Conservation StatusLeast Concern

Natterjacks are among the loudest amphibians, and their call can be heard up to 2 kilometers away.

Nautilus

Nautilus-Image
Scientific NameNautilus spp.
Special HabitMarine cephalopod, shell-dweller
Place of OriginPacific and Indian Oceans
SizeVaries, up to 8-10 inches in diameter
Commonly Found InDeep, tropical ocean waters
Lifespan20-25 years
DietCarnivorous, preys on small fish and crustaceans
ReproductionLay eggs in protective jelly-like capsules
Conservation StatusNot Evaluated

Nautiluses are considered living fossils, as they have remained relatively unchanged for millions of years.

Neanderthal

Neanderthal-Image
Scientific NameHomo neanderthalensis
Special HabitExtinct human species
Place of OriginEurasia, during the Pleistocene epoch
SizeSimilar to modern humans, robust physique
Commonly Found InVarious habitats, adapted to cold climates
LifespanEstimated 30-40 years
DietOmnivorous, hunted and gathered food
ReproductionGave birth to live offspring, likely had cultural practices
Conservation StatusExtinct

Neanderthals had a sophisticated culture, creating tools, art, and even burying their dead.

Neapolitan Mastiff

Neapolitan-Mastiff-Image
Scientific NameCanis lupus familiaris (dog breed)
Special HabitMuscular, loose skin forms characteristic folds
Place of OriginItaly
SizeLarge, powerful build
Commonly Found InDomestic settings, as a companion dog
Lifespan8-10 years
DietTypical canine diet, dog food
ReproductionMammalian, gives birth to live pups
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Neapolitan Mastiffs were historically used as guard dogs and gladiatorial combatants in Ancient Rome.

Nebelung

Nebelung-Image
Scientific NameFelis catus (domestic cat breed)
Special HabitLong-haired, blue-gray coat
Place of OriginDeveloped in the United States
SizeMedium-sized, with a semi-long coat
Commonly Found InDomestic settings, as a house cat
Lifespan12-16 years
DietCarnivorous, standard cat diet
ReproductionDomestic cat, typical feline reproduction
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Nebelungs are known for their striking green eyes and luxurious, silky fur.

Needlefish

Needlefish-Image
Scientific NameBelonidae family
Special HabitSlender, elongated body, needle-like jaws
Place of OriginGlobal, in salt and brackish waters
SizeVaries, some species can grow over a meter long
Commonly Found InCoastal waters, estuaries, and lagoons
LifespanAround 6-10 years
DietCarnivorous, feeds on smaller fish and invertebrates
ReproductionLay eggs in open water
Conservation StatusNot Evaluated

Needlefish are excellent jumpers and can leap out of the water to escape predators or catch prey.

Nelore Cattle

Nelore-Cattle-Image
Scientific NameBos taurus indicus
Special HabitHardy cattle breed, adapted to hot climates
Place of OriginIndia
SizeLarge, muscular build
Commonly Found InVarious tropical regions, widely used in Brazil
Lifespan15-20 years
DietHerbivorous, grazes on grass
ReproductionMammalian, gives birth to live calves
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Nelore cattle are known for their distinctive hump and are highly prized for their adaptability to heat.

Nematode

Nematode-Image
Scientific NameNematoda (Phylum)
Special HabitMicroscopic, parasitic or free-living worms
Place of OriginUbiquitous, found in various habitats
SizeMicroscopic
Commonly Found InSoil, water, and as parasites in plants and animals
LifespanVaries, from a few days to several years
DietParasitic nematodes feed on hosts, free-living ones on organic matter
ReproductionSexual and asexual reproduction, high reproductive potential
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Nematodes play crucial roles in nutrient cycling and can be beneficial in controlling pests in agriculture.

Neon Tetra

Neon-Tetra-Image
Scientific NameParacheirodon innesi
Special HabitColorful, shoaling freshwater fish
Place of OriginAmazon Basin, South America
SizeSmall, typically around 1.5 inches
Commonly Found InAquariums, freshwater streams
Lifespan5-10 years
DietOmnivorous, feeds on small insects and plant matter
ReproductionEgg scatterers, lay eggs among plants
Conservation StatusNot Evaluated

Neon Tetras are popular in the aquarium trade, known for their vibrant blue and red colors.

Neptune Grouper

Scientific NameEpinephelus lanceolatus
Special HabitLarge, predatory reef fish
Place of OriginIndo-Pacific and Red Sea
SizeCan grow over 6 feet in length
Commonly Found InCoral reefs and deep drop-offs
LifespanUp to 50 years
DietCarnivorous, preys on fish, crustaceans, and cephalopods
ReproductionBroadcast spawners, release eggs and sperm into the water
Conservation StatusNear Threatened

Neptune Groupers are known to change color to blend in with their surroundings, aiding in ambushing prey.

Netherland Dwarf Rabbit

Scientific NameOryctolagus cuniculus
Special HabitSmall-sized domestic rabbit breed
Place of OriginNetherlands
SizeVery small, typically under 2.5 pounds
Commonly Found InDomestic settings, as a companion rabbit
Lifespan7-10 years
DietHerbivorous, eats hay, vegetables, and pellets
ReproductionMammalian, gives birth to live kits
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Netherland Dwarf Rabbits have a sweet temperament and are popular as pets due to their small size and cute appearance.

New Hampshire Red Chicken

Scientific NameGallus gallus domesticus
Special HabitForaging, social birds
Place of OriginUnited States
SizeMedium-sized
Commonly Found InPoultry farms, backyard coops
Lifespan5-10 years
DietOmnivorous, eats grains, insects, and plants
ReproductionEgg-laying, typically lay brown eggs
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

New Hampshire Reds are known for their excellent egg-laying capabilities and friendly disposition.

Newfoundland

Scientific NameCanis lupus familiaris
Special HabitWater rescue and draft work
Place of OriginNewfoundland, Canada
SizeLarge, powerful build
Commonly Found InAs a loyal and gentle family dog
Lifespan9-15 years
DietBalanced diet, including high-quality dog food
ReproductionMammalian, gives birth to live pups
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Newfoundlands have webbed feet and are excellent swimmers, making them natural water rescue dogs.

Newfypoo

Newfypoo-Image
Scientific NameCanis lupus familiaris
Special HabitCompanion dog, known for hypoallergenic qualities
Place of OriginUnited States
SizeLarge, with a curly coat
Commonly Found InAs a popular crossbreed dog
Lifespan10-15 years
DietBalanced diet, suitable for large breeds
ReproductionMammalian, gives birth to live pups
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Newfypoos are a crossbreed between a Newfoundland and a Poodle, combining the best qualities of both breeds.

Newt

Scientific NameVarious species within Salamandridae family
Special HabitSemi-aquatic, sensitive to environmental changes
Place of OriginWorldwide, diverse habitats
SizeSmall to medium-sized
Commonly Found InFreshwater ponds, lakes, and forests
Lifespan2-15 years depending on the species
DietCarnivorous, feeds on insects, worms, and small aquatic creatures
ReproductionAquatic larvae stage before transforming into land-dwelling adults
Conservation StatusVaries by species, some are of least concern

Newts have a fascinating ability to regenerate body parts, including limbs and parts of the heart and brain.

Nguni Cattle

Scientific NameBos indicus
Special HabitHardy and adaptable cattle breed, well-suited for African climates
Place of OriginSouthern Africa, especially Nguni people region
SizeMedium-sized, compact build
Commonly Found InSouthern Africa, used by Nguni people for various purposes
Lifespan15-20 years
DietHerbivorous, grazes on grass
ReproductionMammalian, gives birth to live calves
Conservation StatusNot Applicable

Nguni Cattle are highly valued for their resistance to diseases, making them a crucial part of African agriculture and culture.

Nicobar pigeon

Scientific Name:Caloenas nicobarica
Special Habit:Strikingly colorful pigeon with a unique fan-shaped tail.
Place of Origin:Native to the Nicobar Islands and parts of Southeast Asia.
Size:Medium to large, with lengths around 16 to 17 inches.
Commonly Found In:Coastal regions, forests, and on small islands.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 15 years in the wild.
Diet:Omnivorous, feeding on fruits, seeds, and small invertebrates.
Reproduction:Monogamous pairs, laying one egg per clutch.
Conservation Status:Near Threatened; facing habitat loss and hunting pressure.

The Nicobar Pigeon is the radiant rarity. Its iridescent feathers come in a stunning array of colors, making it one of the most visually captivating pigeon species, adding a touch of tropical beauty to its habitats.

Nigerian Goat

Scientific Name:Capra aegagrus hircus
Special Habit:Domesticated breed known for its adaptability and hardiness.
Place of Origin:Bred from indigenous goats in Nigeria and other regions.
Size:Small to medium-sized, with weights around 50 to 100 pounds.
Commonly Found In:Worldwide in various climates, popular in small-scale farming.
Lifespan:Around 8 to 12 years with proper care.
Diet:Herbivorous, feeding on grass, hay, and grains.
Reproduction:Ovoviviparous, giving birth to live young.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated goat breed.

The Nigerian Goat is the petite powerhouse. Despite their small size, they are excellent milk producers and valuable for their adaptability to diverse environments, making them ideal for sustainable farming practices.

Night Adder

Scientific Name:Causus spp. (various species)
Special Habit:Venomous snake with nocturnal habits, often active during the night.
Place of Origin:Found in various regions of Africa.
Size:Moderate, with lengths around 1 to 2 feet.
Commonly Found In:Grasslands, forests, and savannas.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 15 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, feeding on small rodents and amphibians.
Reproduction:Ovoviviparous, giving birth to live young.
Conservation Status:Not Evaluated; localized species with stable populations.

The Night Adder is the shadowy serpent. While their venom is potent for their prey, they play a crucial role in maintaining ecological balance by controlling rodent populations in their habitats.

Night Heron

Night-Heron-Image
Scientific Name:Nycticorax spp. (various species)
Special Habit:Nocturnal heron species with distinctive short legs and a stocky build.
Place of Origin:Found globally in various wetland habitats.
Size:Medium-sized, with lengths around 20 to 28 inches.
Commonly Found In:Marshes, ponds, and other wetland areas.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 15 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, feeding on fish, amphibians, and insects.
Reproduction:Colonial nesters, forming large breeding colonies.
Conservation Status:Not Evaluated; stable populations with adaptability.

The Night Heron is the twilight sentinel. Their exceptional night vision enables them to navigate and hunt efficiently in low-light conditions, making them skilled and stealthy hunters during the darkness.

Night Snake

Special Habit:Nocturnal, non-venomous snake with distinct keeled scales.
Place of Origin:Found in North and Central America.
Size:Small to moderate, with lengths around 1 to 3 feet.
Commonly Found In:Arid regions, deserts, and grasslands.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 15 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, preying on small reptiles and insects.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in concealed locations.
Conservation Status:Not Evaluated; adaptable species with widespread distribution.

The Night Snake is the silent slinker. Despite their unassuming appearance, these snakes are efficient predators, using their nocturnal habits and stealthy approach to hunt for small prey under the cover of darkness.

Nightingale

Scientific Name:Luscinia megarhynchos
Special Habit:Melodious songbird known for its enchanting nocturnal singing.
Place of Origin:Native to Europe, Asia, and Africa.
Size:Small, with lengths around 6 to 7 inches.
Commonly Found In:Woodlands, gardens, and dense shrubbery.
Lifespan:Around 2 to 5 years in the wild.
Diet:Insectivorous, feeding on insects, spiders, and larvae.
Reproduction:Monogamous pairs, building cup-shaped nests for eggs.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; widespread and abundant populations.

The Nightingale is the midnight maestro. Its powerful and intricate songs, often delivered during the night, have inspired poets and musicians for centuries, earning it the title of a renowned songster.

Nightjar

Scientific Name:Caprimulgidae family (various species)
Special Habit:Nocturnal birds with cryptic plumage, adapted for hunting at dusk and dawn.
Place of Origin:Found worldwide, inhabiting a variety of landscapes.
Size:Small to medium-sized, with lengths around 8 to 12 inches.
Commonly Found In:Open woodlands, heaths, and grasslands.
Lifespan:Around 5 to 10 years in the wild.
Diet:Insectivorous, capturing flying insects in mid-air.
Reproduction:Ground-nesting, laying eggs in concealed locations.
Conservation Status:Varies by species; some face threats due to habitat loss.

The Nightjar is the twilight acrobat. Using their wide mouths and superb aerial skills, they perform mid-air acrobatics to catch insects, making them exceptional hunters during the dim hours.

Nile Crocodile

Scientific Name:Crocodylus niloticus
Special Habit:Large, semi-aquatic reptile with a powerful build and formidable jaws.
Place of Origin:Native to freshwater habitats in Africa.
Size:Large, with lengths around 16 to 20 feet.
Commonly Found In:Rivers, lakes, and swamps in sub-Saharan Africa.
Lifespan:Around 70 to 100 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, preying on fish, mammals, and other reptiles.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in sandy nests.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; stable populations, but localized threats exist.

The Nile Crocodile is the river monarch. Known for its cunning hunting techniques, it lurks near riverbanks, using stealth and ambush to catch unsuspecting prey, showcasing the apex predator in African waters.

Nile Monitor

Scientific Name:Varanus niloticus
Special Habit:Agile and diurnal lizard, adept at climbing and swimming.
Place of Origin:Native to sub-Saharan Africa.
Size:Moderate to large, with lengths around 4 to 7 feet.
Commonly Found In:Varied habitats, including savannas, forests, and wetlands.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 15 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, feeding on a diverse range of prey.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in concealed locations.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; adaptable species with stable populations.

The Nile Monitor is the versatile voyager. Its proficiency in both climbing trees and swimming allows it to explore diverse environments, making it a resourceful and widespread lizard.

Nile Perch

Scientific Name:Lates niloticus
Special Habit:Freshwater fish with a sleek body, known for its size and sportfishing appeal.
Place of Origin:Native to the Nile River and other African freshwater bodies.
Size:Large, with weights exceeding 200 pounds.
Commonly Found In:Lakes, rivers, and reservoirs in East Africa.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 15 years.
Diet:Carnivorous, preying on smaller fish and crustaceans.
Reproduction:Oviparous, with females releasing numerous eggs.
Conservation Status:Varies by region; some populations face overfishing challenges.

The Nile Perch is the freshwater behemoth. With its impressive size and sporting challenge, it has become a sought-after catch among anglers, contributing to the popularity of sport

Nilgai

Nilgai-Image
Scientific Name:Boselaphus tragocamelus
Special Habit:Large antelope species with distinctive long, curved horns in males.
Place of Origin:Native to the Indian subcontinent.
Size:Large, with males reaching heights of about 5 feet at the shoulder.
Commonly Found In:Grasslands, scrub forests, and agricultural areas.
Lifespan:Around 15 to 20 years in the wild.
Diet:Herbivorous, grazing on grasses and vegetation.
Reproduction:Polygamous, with males forming bachelor groups.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; stable populations with adaptability.

The Nilgai is the grassland giant. Despite their sizable appearance, they are remarkably agile and can sprint at high speeds when needed, showcasing a surprising blend of strength and grace.

No See Ums

Scientific Name:Ceratopogonidae family (various species)
Special Habit:Tiny biting midges known for their nuisance factor and ability to be nearly invisible.
Place of Origin:Found globally, especially in humid and coastal regions.
Size:Extremely small, ranging from 1 to 3 millimeters.
Commonly Found In:Coastal areas, forests, and areas with standing water.
Lifespan:Short, typically a few weeks to a month.
Diet:Blood-feeding, with females requiring blood for egg development.
Reproduction:Females lay eggs in moist environments, such as mud or damp soil.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; considered a pest species.

No See Ums are the stealthy biters. Despite their diminutive size, their bites can be quite irritating due to the anticoagulant they inject, leaving victims scratching and swatting at these elusive pests.

Norfolk Terrier

Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Small terrier breed with a charming personality and compact build.
Place of Origin:Originated in England, specifically Norfolk.
Size:Small, with heights around 9 to 10 inches at the shoulder.
Commonly Found In:Domesticated as companion animals worldwide.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 15 years with proper care.
Diet:Omnivorous, typically fed on commercial dog food.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated dog breed.

The Norfolk Terrier is the spirited companion. Known for their friendly disposition and fearless nature, these terriers make excellent family pets and are always ready for a playful adventure.

Norrbottenspets

Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Spitz-type dog breed with a lively and affectionate temperament.
Place of Origin:Originated in Sweden, particularly in the Norrbotten region.
Size:Small to medium, with heights around 17 to 20 inches.
Commonly Found In:Domesticated as a working and companion dog in various regions.
Lifespan:Around 13 to 16 years with proper care.
Diet:Omnivorous, with a diet primarily consisting of dog food.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated dog breed.

The Norrbottenspets is the lively lapdog. Despite their small size, these dogs have a strong work ethic and were traditionally used for hunting and herding in their native Sweden.

North American Black Bear

Scientific Name:Ursus americanus
Special Habit:Omnivorous bear with a broad diet, including berries, insects, and small mammals.
Place of Origin:Native to North America, inhabiting forests and mountainous regions.
Size:Medium to large, with weights ranging from 200 to 600 pounds.
Commonly Found In:Forested areas, mountains, and sometimes suburban regions.
Lifespan:Around 20 to 30 years in the wild.
Diet:Omnivorous, with a varied diet based on seasonal availability.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to cubs during winter hibernation.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; stable populations with conservation efforts.

North American Black Bears are skilled climbers, often ascending trees to escape predators or forage for food. Despite their size, their agility in trees is surprising, showcasing their adaptability to diverse environments.

Northern Alligator Lizard

Scientific Name:Elgaria coerulea
Special Habit:Terrestrial lizard with a distinctive appearance resembling an alligator.
Place of Origin:Native to western North America, from British Columbia to California.
Size:Moderate, with lengths around 8 to 14 inches.
Commonly Found In:Forested areas, grasslands, and rocky habitats.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 20 years in the wild.
Diet:Insectivorous, feeding on insects and small invertebrates.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in concealed locations.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; widespread and adaptable species.

The Northern Alligator Lizard has a remarkable ability to shed and regrow its tail. This adaptation serves as a defense mechanism, distracting predators and providing the lizard a chance to escape.

Northern Bobwhite

Northern-Bobwhite-Image
Scientific Name:Colinus virginianus
Special Habit:Ground-dwelling quail with a distinctive “bob-white” call.
Place of Origin:Native to North America, particularly the eastern and central regions.
Size:Small, with lengths around 9 to 11 inches.
Commonly Found In:Grasslands, agricultural fields, and open woodlands.
Lifespan:Around 1 to 2 years in the wild.
Diet:Omnivorous, feeding on seeds, insects, and small plants.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in nests on the ground.
Conservation Status:Near Threatened; facing habitat loss and decline in some areas.

The Northern Bobwhite is a social bird, often forming coveys (groups) for foraging and protection. Their cooperative behavior helps increase their chances of survival in the wild.

Northern Cardinal

Scientific Name:Cardinalis cardinalis
Special Habit:Striking red songbird with a distinctive crest, commonly seen in residential areas.
Place of Origin:Native to North America, particularly the eastern United States.
Size:Small to medium, with lengths around 8 to 9 inches.
Commonly Found In:Woodlands, gardens, and urban areas.
Lifespan:Around 3 years in the wild.
Diet:Omnivorous, feeding on seeds, fruits, insects, and small invertebrates.
Reproduction:Oviparous, with females building cup-shaped nests for eggs.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; abundant and widespread across its range.

Northern Cardinals are known for their beautiful songs, and interestingly, both males and females sing. The male’s vibrant red plumage serves as a visual display during courtship.

Northern Flicker

Scientific Name:Colaptes auratus
Special Habit:Woodpecker species with a distinctive black crescent on the chest.
Place of Origin:Native to North America, inhabiting various wooded habitats.
Size:Medium-sized, with lengths around 11 to 14 inches.
Commonly Found In:Forests, woodlands, and urban areas with trees.
Lifespan:Around 6 to 7 years in the wild.
Diet:Insectivorous, using its specialized bill to extract insects from trees.
Reproduction:Oviparous, nesting in tree cavities and laying eggs.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; adaptable and common throughout its range.

The Northern Flicker’s feeding habits differ from typical woodpeckers. Instead of mainly drilling into wood for insects, they often forage on the ground for ants and beetles, using their barbed tongues to capture prey.

Northern Fur Seal

Scientific Name:Callorhinus ursinus
Special Habit:Marine mammal known for long oceanic migrations and extensive time spent at sea.
Place of Origin:North Pacific Ocean, including the coasts of Russia, Japan, Alaska, and California.
Size:Medium-sized, with males reaching lengths of 6 feet and weighing around 600 pounds.
Commonly Found In:Coastal and offshore waters, often forming colonies on remote islands.
Lifespan:Around 20 to 25 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, primarily feeding on fish and squid.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth on land in large colonies.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; stable populations with some fluctuations.

Northern Fur Seals are excellent swimmers, capable of diving to great depths and covering extensive distances during their oceanic travels.

Northern Harrier

Scientific Name:Circus hudsonius
Special Habit:Diurnal bird of prey known for its distinctive hovering behavior while hunting.
Place of Origin:North and South America, inhabiting open areas like grasslands and marshes.
Size:Medium-sized raptor, with wingspans around 3.5 to 4.5 feet.
Commonly Found In:Open habitats, including fields, marshes, and grasslands.
Lifespan:Around 10 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, preying on small mammals, birds, and insects.
Reproduction:Oviparous, building nests on the ground or low vegetation.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; widespread and adaptable species.

Northern Harriers have a facial disk similar to owls, aiding in sound localization while hunting. Their aerobatic displays during courtship are a captivating sight.

Northern Inuit Dog

Northern-Inuit-Dog-Image
Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Domestic dog breed developed to resemble the appearance of wolves.
Place of Origin:Originated in the United Kingdom as a breed created for its wolf-like appearance.
Size:Medium to large, with heights around 23 to 32 inches at the shoulder.
Commonly Found In:Domesticated as companion animals in various households.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 15 years, depending on care and genetics.
Diet:Domesticated dogs often consume commercial dog food.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to litters of puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; a domesticated breed without wild populations.

The Northern Inuit Dog’s wolf-like appearance is intentional, as the breed was developed to capture the aesthetic qualities of wolves while maintaining a friendly and trainable temperament.

Northern Jacana

Scientific Name:Jacana spinosa
Special Habit:Wader bird with long legs and distinctive toe extensions for walking on floating vegetation.
Place of Origin:Native to the Americas, including parts of the United States, Mexico, and Central America.
Size:Small to medium-sized, with lengths around 8 to 10 inches.
Commonly Found In:Marshes, ponds, and wetlands with floating vegetation.
Lifespan:Around 7 to 10 years in the wild.
Diet:Omnivorous, feeding on insects, small invertebrates, and plant matter.
Reproduction:Oviparous, building nests on floating vegetation.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; adaptable species with stable populations.

Northern Jacanas are known for their exceptional parental care, with males taking the lead in incubating eggs and caring for chicks.

Northern Parula

Scientific Name:Setophaga americana
Special Habit:Small migratory songbird with striking blue and yellow plumage.
Place of Origin:Breeds in North America, particularly in deciduous forests. Migrates to Central America in winter.
Size:Small, with lengths around 3.5 to 4 inches.
Commonly Found In:Forested areas, especially near water, during the breeding season.
Lifespan:Around 7 to 10 years in the wild.
Diet:Insectivorous, primarily feeding on small insects and spiders.
Reproduction:Oviparous, building nests in trees and shrubs.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; widespread with stable populations.

The Northern Parula is known for its unique feeding behavior called “hover-gleaning,” where it hovers in the air to catch insects from the undersides of leaves.

Northern Pintail

Scientific Name:Anas acuta
Special Habit:Migratory dabbling duck known for its distinctive long, pointed tail feathers.
Place of Origin:Breeds in northern regions, including North America, Europe, and Asia.
Size:Medium-sized duck, with lengths around 20 to 30 inches.
Commonly Found In:Wetlands, ponds, lakes, and coastal areas during migration.
Lifespan:Around 5 to 10 years in the wild.
Diet:Omnivorous, feeding on aquatic plants, insects, and small invertebrates.
Reproduction:Oviparous, building nests on the ground or in vegetation.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; populations generally stable.

Male Northern Pintails are easily recognizable by their long, elegant necks and distinctive white markings on their sides.

Northern Potoo

Scientific Name:Nyctibius jamaicensis
Special Habit:Nocturnal bird known for its cryptic plumage and large, gape-limited mouth.
Place of Origin:Found in Central and South America, residing in forests and woodlands.
Size:Medium-sized bird, with lengths around 12 to 16 inches.
Commonly Found In:Forested areas, roosting on tree branches during the day.
Lifespan:Around 5 to 10 years in the wild.
Diet:Insectivorous, capturing insects in flight using its large mouth.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs on flat surfaces like tree branches.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; populations considered stable.

The Northern Potoo is a master of camouflage, resembling a broken tree stump when perched on a branch during the day.

Northern Screamer

Scientific Name:Chauna chavaria
Special Habit:Large, noisy bird with a distinctive call, often found near water.
Place of Origin:Native to South America, particularly in wetlands and riverside habitats.
Size:Large bird, with lengths around 35 to 40 inches.
Commonly Found In:Marshes, swamps, and riverbanks.
Lifespan:Around 15 to 20 years in the wild.
Diet:Herbivorous, feeding on aquatic plants, grasses, and small invertebrates.
Reproduction:Oviparous, building nests on the ground or in vegetation.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; populations stable in appropriate habitats.

Northern Screamers are excellent swimmers, using their webbed feet to navigate through aquatic environments.

Northern Water Snake

Scientific Name:Nerodia sipedon
Special Habit:Semi-aquatic snake commonly found near freshwater habitats.
Place of Origin:North America, inhabiting lakes, rivers, ponds, and streams.
Size:Medium-sized snake, with lengths around 24 to 55 inches.
Commonly Found In:Aquatic habitats, often basking on rocks or vegetation.
Lifespan:Around 5 to 9 years in the wild.
Diet:Carnivorous, preying on fish, amphibians, and small mammals.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in nests near water.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; adaptable species with stable populations.

Despite their name, Northern Water Snakes are not venomous and play a vital role in controlling aquatic pest populations.

Norway Rat

Norway-Rat-Image
Scientific Name:Rattus norvegicus
Special Habit:Highly adaptable rodent, often associated with human habitats.
Place of Origin:Originated in China but spread globally due to human activities.
Size:Medium-sized rodent, with lengths around 7 to 9 inches.
Commonly Found In:Urban and rural areas, often near human dwellings.
Lifespan:Around 1 to 3 years in the wild.
Diet:Omnivorous, feeding on a wide range of food items, including grains and garbage.
Reproduction:Ovoviviparous, giving birth to live young.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; considered a pest species in many regions.

Norway Rats have strong teeth that grow continuously, requiring gnawing to keep them at a manageable length.

Norwegian Buhund

Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Herding dog with a keen sense of smell and agility.
Place of Origin:Norway, used as a farm dog for herding and guarding.
Size:Medium-sized dog, typically 16 to 18 inches in height.
Commonly Found In:Farms, rural areas, and as a companion in households.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 15 years.
Diet:Balanced canine diet, including high-quality dog food.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated breed.

Norwegian Buhunds are known for their distinctive curled tails and spitz-like appearance, making them both charming and functional.

Norwegian Elkhound

Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Hunting and guarding dog, historically used for elk hunting.
Place of Origin:Norway, specifically bred for hunting large game.
Size:Medium to large-sized dog, around 19.5 to 20.5 inches in height.
Commonly Found In:Hunting areas, forests, and as a loyal companion.
Lifespan:Approximately 12 to 15 years.
Diet:Balanced canine diet, with a focus on nutrition for active breeds.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated breed.

Norwegian Elkhounds have a thick, double coat that provides insulation, allowing them to withstand cold temperatures during hunts.

Norwegian Forest Cat

Scientific Name:Felis catus
Special Habit:Forest-dwelling cat breed known for its semi-longhair coat.
Place of Origin:Norway, where it adapted to cold climates.
Size:Medium to large-sized cat, typically 12 to 16 pounds.
Commonly Found In:Forested areas and as a companion in households.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 16 years.
Diet:High-quality cat food, with occasional treats.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live kittens.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated breed.

Norwegian Forest Cats have tufted ears and bushy tails, resembling their wild ancestors, and are known for their friendly nature.

Norwegian Lundehund

Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Unique dog breed with six toes on each foot and exceptional flexibility.
Place of Origin:Norway, historically used for puffin hunting.
Size:Small to medium-sized dog, typically 12 to 15 inches in height.
Commonly Found In:Coastal areas and as a companion in households.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 14 years.
Diet:Balanced canine diet, with attention to joint health.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated breed.

Norwegian Lundehunds have extraordinary shoulder joints, allowing them to rotate their forelegs to a 90-degree angle, aiding in climbing cliffs.

Norwich Terrier

Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Terrier breed with a lively and fearless disposition.
Place of Origin:United Kingdom, originally bred for ratting.
Size:Small-sized dog, typically 9 to 10 inches in height.
Commonly Found In:Urban and rural areas as a companion.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 16 years.
Diet:Balanced canine diet, adjusted to the dog’s size and activity level.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated breed.

Norwich Terriers are known for their “prick” ears and wiry coats, giving them an endearing and alert appearance.

Nose-Horned Viper

Nose-Horned-Viper-Image
Scientific Name:Vipera ammodytes
Special Habit:Solitary and venomous snake, recognized for its distinct nose-like appendage.
Place of Origin:Southern Europe, primarily in rocky habitats.
Size:Medium-sized viper, typically 24 to 35 inches in length.
Commonly Found In:Rocky areas, scrublands, and forests.
Lifespan:Around 10 to 15 years.
Diet:Carnivorous, preying on small mammals, birds, and lizards.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in protected locations.
Conservation Status:Not evaluated; localized populations may face threats.

The Nose-Horned Viper’s unique nose-horn is used for digging in the soil and aiding in camouflage, making it a master of ambush.

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Scientific Name:Canis lupus familiaris
Special Habit:Energetic and agile retriever breed, known for its “tolling” or luring technique.
Place of Origin:Canada, specifically developed for duck tolling in Nova Scotia.
Size:Medium-sized dog, typically 17 to 21 inches in height.
Commonly Found In:Waterfowl areas, lakesides, and as a family companion.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 14 years.
Diet:Balanced canine diet, with a focus on energy needs.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live puppies.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated breed.

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is nicknamed the “Toller” and is renowned for its playful nature and ability to lure ducks within gunshot range.

Nubian Goat

Scientific Name:Capra hircus
Special Habit:Domesticated goat breed, valued for milk and meat production.
Place of Origin:Africa, with the Nubian region being a significant contributor.
Size:Medium to large-sized goat, typically 23 to 31 inches in height.
Commonly Found In:Various regions worldwide, often in small farms and homesteads.
Lifespan:Around 12 to 15 years.
Diet:Herbivorous, consuming grass, leaves, and grains.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live kids.
Conservation Status:Not applicable; domesticated breed.

Nubian Goats are recognized for their long, pendulous ears and are known to be excellent milk producers with high butterfat content.

Nudibranch

Scientific Name:Nudibranchia
Special Habit:Soft-bodied marine gastropod mollusk, renowned for vibrant colors and intricate patterns.
Place of Origin:Oceans worldwide, from shallow to deep waters.
Size:Small to medium-sized, ranging from a few millimeters to several inches.
Commonly Found In:Coral reefs, rocky shores, and ocean floors.
Lifespan:Variable, with some species living a few weeks to a few months.
Diet:Carnivorous, feeding on sponges, anemones, and other small marine organisms.
Reproduction:Hermaphroditic, with complex mating rituals.
Conservation Status:Diverse, with specific species facing various threats.

Nudibranchs are sometimes called “sea slugs,” but they exhibit flamboyant colors as a warning to potential predators about their toxicity.

Numbat

Numbat-Image
Scientific Name:Myrmecobius fasciatus
Special Habit:Marsupial anteater, primarily feeding on termites.
Place of Origin:Australia, particularly in eucalyptus woodlands.
Size:Small-sized marsupial, typically 7 to 11 inches in length.
Commonly Found In:Woodlands and areas with termite populations.
Lifespan:Around 5 to 6 years.
Diet:Insectivorous, specializing in termites.
Reproduction:Viviparous, giving birth to live young.
Conservation Status:Endangered due to habitat loss and predation.

The Numbat has a distinctive striped pattern on its back and is also known as the “banded anteater” for its termite-focused diet.

Nuralagus

Scientific Name:Nuralagus rex
Special Habit:Extinct genus of giant rabbit, known for its unusually large size.
Place of Origin:Previously inhabited the island of Minorca in the Mediterranean.
Size:Remarkably large for a rabbit, estimated to be around 26 pounds.
Commonly Found In:Extinct; fossils found on the island of Minorca.
Lifespan:Extinct; believed to have lived during the Miocene epoch.
Diet:Herbivorous, likely consuming plants on the island.
Reproduction:Limited information; presumed to be similar to other rabbits.
Conservation Status:Extinct due to unknown factors.

Nuralagus rex holds the title for being one of the largest rabbits ever known, showcasing the fascinating diversity in the animal kingdom.

Nurse Shark

Scientific Name:Ginglymostoma cirratum
Special Habit:Bottom-dwelling shark species, characterized by barbels near its mouth.
Place of Origin:Warm coastal waters of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Oceans.
Size:Medium-sized shark, typically 7 to 9 feet in length.
Commonly Found In:Coastal areas, coral reefs, and shallow waters.
Lifespan:Around 25 to 30 years.
Diet:Carnivorous, feeding on small fish, crustaceans, and invertebrates.
Reproduction:Oviparous, laying eggs in protected areas.
Conservation Status:Not evaluated; generally not a target for fisheries.

Nurse sharks are known for their docile nature, and they are often observed resting on the ocean floor during the day.

Nut Weevil

Scientific Name:Curculionidae family (various species)
Special Habit:Small beetles with an elongated snout, known for feeding on nuts.
Place of Origin:Worldwide, with diverse species adapted to different ecosystems.
Size:Tiny, ranging from a few millimeters to around 1 inch.
Commonly Found In:Various habitats, especially areas with nut-bearing trees.
Lifespan:Variable, with different species having different lifecycles.
Diet:Herbivorous, feeding on nuts and seeds.
Reproduction:Varied, with some species laying eggs in nuts.
Conservation Status:Not evaluated; numerous species with varying statuses.

Nut weevils play a crucial ecological role in seed dispersal, as they often bury nuts, facilitating the growth of new plants.

Nuthatch

Scientific Name:Sittidae family (various species)
Special Habit:Small birds known for their unique habit of climbing down tree trunks.
Place of Origin:Worldwide, with various species adapted to different regions.
Size:Small to medium-sized, typically 4 to 7 inches in length.
Commonly Found In:Woodlands, forests, and gardens with trees.
Lifespan:Around 2 to 3 years.
Diet:Insectivorous, feeding on insects, seeds, and nuts.
Reproduction:Typically monogamous, with both parents involved in nesting.
Conservation Status:Not evaluated; diverse species with varied statuses.

Nuthatches are skilled acrobats, moving headfirst down tree trunks in their search for insects and seeds.

Nutria

Scientific Name:Myocastor coypus
Special Habit:Semi-aquatic rodent with webbed hind feet, adapted to aquatic life.
Place of Origin:South America; introduced to various regions for fur farming.
Size:Medium-sized, typically 17 to 25 inches in length, excluding the tail.
Commonly Found In:Wetlands, riversides, and freshwater habitats.
Lifespan:Around 3 to 6 years.
Diet:Herbivorous, consuming aquatic plants, roots, and vegetation.
Reproduction:Polygamous, with females giving birth to litters.
Conservation Status:Considered invasive in some regions due to population explosion.

Nutrias are strong swimmers and are often considered pests in areas where they have been introduced, causing damage to wetland ecosystems.

Nyala

Nyala-Image
Scientific Name:Tragelaphus angasii
Special Habit:Medium-sized antelope with spiral horns, native to southern Africa.
Place of Origin:Woodlands and savannas of southern Malawi, Mozambique, and South Africa.
Size:Males stand about 43 to 47 inches at the shoulder.
Commonly Found In:Dense woodlands and thickets near water sources.
Lifespan:Around 8 to 10 years.
Diet:Herbivorous, feeding on a variety of plants and shrubs.
Reproduction:Polygamous, with dominant males mating with multiple females.
Conservation Status:Least Concern; stable population in its native range.

Nyala males have distinct spiral horns and a striking appearance, making them a notable species in the African savanna.

To Wrap Up

And that’s a wrap on our adventure with over 160 animals that start with N! 

Keep being curious about the amazing animals around us, and let’s all play our part in preserving their habitats for a happy and healthy future. Thanks for exploring with us!

About Sabrina Tulip

I'm Sabrina Tulip, and I have a deep passion for all things animal world. I'm committed to helping others who loves wild animals. Reach out to me at sabrina@animallists.com for gardening advice and tips. Let's make the world a little greener together!

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